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Sherry in Uvinum's blog

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World Sherry Day

 TAGS:On World Sherry Day we should organize a pilgrimage to the area and plan it ahead to have time enough to visit several wineries. I propose to extend this day at least forty eight hours because between fino wine, sherry, sweet sherry, a plate of olives, pastries, etc.. with just twenty four hours we will only have time to get started. Wait, good news: the World Sherry Day already lasts a week long. Hurra!!!

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Fortified wines for cooking: marsala, porto, sherry


 - The wines are our closest ally in the kitchen, not just for that shot that we took while we cook, but for the variety and intensity of flavors and aromas that are achieved by adding them to our recipes. While my neighbor is the largest specialist I know about cooking with wine, as I think all his recipes include its secret ingredient (by all accounts): old wine, I also use Marsala, Porto, Sherry and Madeira to cook quite often.

Many people know the benefits of these wines to accompany desserts. A glass of Porto with some almond cake bearing some black chocolate ... mmmhhhh delicious! Or that sherry, in all its varieties, which take us from the appetizer, to the food (yes, of course you can eat with sherry, choosing the right variety) to get to the desserts and coffees, that may become mythical if you know a good wine to accompany sweet or fragrant Jerez.

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Elaboration and variants of sherry

The sherry is not a single wine, but its appellation includes 4 variants that come from a base liquid elaborated in the same way:

By law, the initial 70% of the pressing is used to develop fino wines and light or common sherry, the next 20% goes to the production of oloroso and other wines of lesser quality, while any remaining liquid should be distilled (converted in a spirit like cognac).

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Sherry and Pedro Ximenez

 TAGS:Pedro Ximenez and Palomino Fino are the grape varieties which define the character of the regions of Cordoba and Andalusia in Spain, respectively, since in these hot and dry lands are produced the country's most recognized wines, sherry and Pedro Ximenez. In the sixteenth century, long before the world knew of Rioja and Ribera del Duero, two of the most famous appellations, these two drinks were already successful exports, being the UK their main destination.

In fact, it was the marriage of Catherine of Aragon, the eldest daughter of the Catholic Kings, with Prince Arthur of England which boosted the trade in these products outside the borders. To the extent that much later, in the nineteenth century, sherry accounted for 40% of wine imports in Great Britain.