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White grapes' aromas

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Classic questions in those who approach to the world of wine tasting are on the aromas. How does this wine smell? What should you smell? The smell of one thing or another, is it good or bad?
White Wine GlassIf you've ever seen in movies the classic sketch in which an expert is able to reveal the vintage, type of grape, the origin, the make and even if the keeper of the wine cellar had cached a cold in October, you cannot help feeling frustrated, when then you go and smell a wine and you’re not able to identify any does things. However, it is normal at first not to know how does the wine you taste exactly smells. 

In my case, the transition has been far more natural than that. I tasted a wine, and if I liked it I would look at the label and tried to remember the name. Later, what type of grape was? In varietal wines, went gradually finding matches between a Chardonnay, for example, and a different grape. So I learned the aromas given off by each grape.
I could not name the aromas, but I knew the difference between a Macabeo and Riesling.
I always recommend start on tasting white wine, because the range of aromas are much different between each other (floral, fruit, herbs, honey ,...) than red wines, which can also include aromas of barrel aging .

Finally, in a tasting course they gave me the proper names for the impressions perceived. And so I began to be considered as an assessor, but I like to think I'm just a wine lover.
"Do grapes smell different? Yes, as you know a cherry tomato is different form a pear tomato. But if you make a gazpacho mixing these two varieties, it would be difficult to distinguish them. So If you're interested in learning how to taste wines start with varietals in order to recognize each grape individually.

The smell of one thing or another, is it good or bad? Depends on whether you like the scent or not. There are very faithful to the generic flavor of the grape wines, because the grape winery that wants to take his best, but some wineries (or winemakers) make completely different wines, in which you can hardly recognize the grapes, because they want to emphasize that their vineyards are unique and different, or are able to obtain new flavors in this variety. Everything is ok if you like the result.
What should a white wine smell like? Who knows. Throughout history a standard of aromas have been established, which are the aromas that are usually present in each type of grape. But it is not the same a Gewürztraminer grown in La Mancha than in Austria.Even with a particular wine, as the vineyard ages or external factors change (global warming, new pressing and lift, winemakers contributions), the resulting wine might have change its aromas.
Finally, we must consider that it will not smell the same when wine grapes are collected green, from those collected mellow. It is Logical, right?

Albariño GrapesThe standard of white grapes are more or less, the following:

• Chardonnay: Green apple, lemon, grapefruit, pineapple, melon, banana, ...
• Riesling: Green apple, citrus, quince, smoked, spicy, petroleum, ...
• Gewürztraminer: rose, gardenia, lychee, mango, peach, ...
• Macabeo / Viura: green fruit, apple, white flowers, wine, ...
• Muscat: There are as many varieties of Muscat as aromas. Also, when it comes to wine varietal it overripe grapes are often used: candied fruits, honey, dried rose petals, orange blossom, peaches in syrup, ...
• Sauvignon Blanc: ripe fruit, smoke, asparagus, green pepper, passion fruit, ...
• Albariño: golden apple, honey, apricot, floral, ...
• Airen: banana, pineapple, hay, barley, lavender, ...
• Malmsey: white fruit, lemon, peach, plum, ...
• Palomino: Lima, bitter almonds, aniseed, salt, balsamic, ...
• Verdejo: White fruit, green grass, mango, melon, fennel, ...
Can a wine made from these grapes smell like something else? Yes, of course. Additionally, the name of the aroma must be named after whatever that aroma reminds you. In some tasting notes can be read: aromas "dew of a morning in October," "recently changed sheets", "red apple cut in two",” bakery working full time ",... seem absurd, but if you read carefully that would bring up to your mind some aroma.
How do we know if a wine that smells like apple is a Chardonnay, Riesling, Macabeo, Albariño or any other grape? Well, the aromas are not exclusive. The same wine has several flavors at once, so try to identify other aromas in the glass to help you to decide. More than a recommendation it is an obligation for those who like wine: try, try, try and try ...

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